Category Archives: Academia

Promoting writing amongst peers: establishing a community of writing practice for early career academics

In 2015 myself and some other early-career colleagues were struggling with finding time to set aside to concentrating on writing. Finding the time, confidence, and discipline to write had consistently proven elusive with transitioning from research fellow/PhD positions to full-time academic roles. With yet another teaching semester drawing to a close we decided it was time to tackle the problem directly and took ourselves off to a cottage in Wales for a few days. We adopted an already published timetable for writing, including time for goal-setting and reviewing, and got a lot of work done over our few days away. With new-found enthusiasm and discipline we decided to convene some writing days involving other colleagues over the subsequent summer and we decided to reflect on what we’d learnt about improving our writing practice by writing it up as an academic paper! It was published today!

Click HERE to read the full paper.

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Research Assisting…. Me :)

If any psychology friends have any students with an interest in memory and cognitive ageing who have just graduated from a BSc pass on this link to them… It’s for an RA job working with me. Closing date Sunday 7th August. Full job specification and details of the role provided in the link here.

 

 

Keele University School of Psychology: Two fully-funded PhD Studentships in the Centre for Psychological Research

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Me on my PhD graduation day

If you’re interested in my research, come and work with me!

We currently have two fully-funded PhD Studentships in the Centre for Psychological Research at Keele University that you can apply for; to commence in September 2016.
Interested applicants are encouraged to visit our research web-pages to find out more about staff research interests. Applicants are strongly advised to discuss their potential project with prospective supervisors in advance of submitting their application.
Please note that you must provide the following with your application:
    • A full research proposal for your PhD (maximum 4 sides of A4)
    • A sample of academic work (maximum 5,000 words)
    • Two academic references
    • Copies of your previous qualifications
    • A completed Case for Support form (see Supplementary Information)

For further information please use the following link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgresearch/studentships/ (and scroll down to the bottom of the page).

Deadline for applications is 15th April 2016.

ESRC Future Research Leader award

JPG RGB LargeIn January 2015 I applied for a Future Research Leader award from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This award scheme is a prestigious scheme through which the ESRC funds the research of a small number of early career researchers who have the potential to be future leaders in their research fields.

This was the first big grant that I have applied for and I found it very stressful writing the application and dealing with the ‘impostor feeling’ and that I was not good enough to receive this type of award, especially as I know this grant scheme is extremely prestigious and very competitive. Continue reading

Don’t be that dude: Handy tips for the male academic

This post by Tenure, She Wrote is thought provoking for male and female academics alike. I’m re-blogging it here for continued thought and discussion. I’d love to know what you think!

Tenure, She Wrote

There is a plethora of research on the causes of hostile environments for women in academia, and on why we have an underrepresentation of women in many fields. There are support groups for women, societies entirely devoted to women academics (broadly and field-specific), workshops for women in academia, and countless articles and blogs devoted to the topic.

These initiatives are important, but here’s the thing: gender equality has to be a collaborative venture. If men make up the majority of many departments, editorial boards, search committees, labs and conferences, then men have to be allies in the broader cause of equality, simply because they have more boots on the ground. And, as much as I wish it weren’t so, guys often tend to listen more readily to their fellow guys when it comes to issues like sexism. I’ve also found that there are a lot of guys out there…

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That Shirt.

Photo from the ESA news stream, via @RoseVeleth's Twitter feed

Photo from the ESA news stream, via @RoseVeleth’s Twitter feed

Last week, the European Space Agency landed a space probe on a comet. The Rosetta mission’s project scientist, Matt Taylor, went on international television to talk about the success. He wore a shirt covered in drawings of scantily clad women with big boobs and big guns. This was inappropriate, unprofessional, and sexist.

Infactorium wrote an excellent summary of why this shirt was wrong, wrong, wrong:

Infactorium

A senior scientist on the Rosetta/Philae mission (a stunning success, brilliant and audacious, thrilling!) decided to show up for work on perhaps the most important day of the mission, the most important day in spaceflight since Curiosity landed on Mars, wearing a crappy bowling shirt covered in cartoonish images of half-naked women. He further compounded this stupid decision by referring to the Rosetta mission with “She’s sexy, but I never said she was easy.”

I’m not going to condemn a man for owning an awful shirt with half-naked women on it. That’s his own business, and I couldn’t care less. But it shows a staggering lack of judgement, and callousness to what others might infer, to wear this shirt to work. At all. When grownups go to work, they should dress appropriately for work. And unless you work at a bowling alley/strip club, that shirt is almost certainly not appropriate. It…

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Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014: The winners are…

A colleague (and friend) Richard Stephens from Keele School of Psychology just won the Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014 – well done Richard! His winning piece “Don’t say cheese, say cheeks” will appear in full in the Guardian/the Observer and on the Wellcome Trust blog in the coming weeks

Wellcome Trust Blog

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The winners of the fourth Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize were announced this evening at a ceremony held at Wellcome Trust HQ in London. With over 600 entries to choose from, picking a single winner in each category was no simple task…

IMG_0959“Communicating with the public in getting their insight into the work you do can help inform your research questions,” says Wellcome Trust Director Jeremy Farrar. That’s one of the reasons it is so important for us to nurture the next generation of science writers and encourage scientists to think about ways of communicating their work.

The Wellcome Trust science writing prize, run in conjunction with the Guardian and the Observer, is an opportunity for aspiring science communicators to write about research that inspires them, and we’re always delighted with the high quality and number of entries that we receive.

Split into two categories – professional scientists (postgraduate…

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